Earlier this month, I did my first bar chart race with victories by program. My first request for a follow-up was championships. Well, here you go… Wyoming state football championships in bar chart race form.

To see the presentation on its own page, click here.

(Note that in the above chart, I had to limit it to 20 bars. More than that and stuff becomes too small to see — which is why not every team who won a championship will show up here. Even at 20, it gets small… best viewed on a screen with a high resolution.)

I’m working on my third bar chart race right now. Any other chart races you’d like to see?

–patrick

Before we dive headlong into the 2020s and prepare for another decade of Wyoming high school football, here’s a quick glance back at the eight things that I think made football in the 2010s particularly memorable. In no particular order, they are:

1. Six new programs start football: From 2010 to 2019, six new programs entered the fray — five new programs in Cheyenne South, Thunder Basin, St. Stephens, Encampment and Rock River and one new co-op with Upton-Sundance. The start-up programs had mixed success levels, with Thunder Basin’s trip to the 4A title game in 2019 the best of the bunch, but Upton-Sundance’s co-op has been a consistent contender and won the 1A 11-man championship in 2015. Encampment revived its program in 2019 and played a hodgepodge of schools at six-man; the Tigers will make the jump to varsity in 2020. Meanwhile, Cheyenne South has just one playoff berth since 2011; St. Stephens has yet to make the postseason; and Rock River only completed three seasons at the varsity level before folding the program, apparently for good.

2. Nine-man football returns to Wyoming: In April of this year, the Wyoming High School Activities Association approved a nine-man football division for Class 1A, with the first season scheduled for 2020. The state will remain with five classifications, as 1A 11-man changes to 1A nine-man. The decision prompted some tough choices, and after the dust settled, 16 schools were in Class 2A, 14 in 1A nine-man and 13 in 1A six-man.

3. Six-man sees big growth: When six-man football was re-introduced in 2009, no one was quite sure how long it would last, or if it would last at all. With only eight teams in the first two seasons in 2009 and 2010, those concerns were justified. However, six-man proved a steady, solid choice for many small schools, and the classification eventually grew to as many as 16 teams as new programs started and other small schools made the choice to play the 80×40 version of the game. Also, the Six-Man Shootout between Nebraska and Wyoming all-stars started in 2012, a nice boost to the game for both states.

4. Class 4A’s Big Four sustain dominant status: From 2010-15, the same four programs (Cheyenne East, Gillette, Natrona and Sheridan) reached the Class 4A semifinals, an unprecedented run of success. Although Rock Springs, Kelly Walsh and Cheyenne Central (and eventually Thunder Basin, which usurped Gillette’s role in the Big Four) all made their way into the 4A semifinals once this decade, it wasn’t enough. Sheridan had the most success of the Big Four, winning five 4A championships in the decade to improve their state-best overall mark to 27 championships, while Natrona won four and East one.

5. Laramie claims role of title-game host: Yes, Laramie and the University of Wyoming hosted the title games for the first time in 2009, but in the 2010s, the city and university gained a much stronger hold on the championships. In case you don’t remember, the decision to move the title games was divisive. However, over the course of this decade, the War has become the spot for title games — an experience like none other for Wyoming’s high school players fortunate enough to make it there.

6. Kaycee and Powell make runs at a record: In winning three consecutive Class 3A championships in 2011-13, Powell won 27 consecutive games — within spitting distance of the state record for consecutive victories, Laramie’s 34 set from 1959-63. That march stopped early in the 2014 season; however, Kaycee came even closer, winning 30 straight games from 2015-17 while notching three consecutive Class 1A six-man titles.

7. Lincoln County dynasties keep rolling: Three programs in the 2010s — Sheridan, Star Valley and Cokeville — won four championships in the span of five years. The last two just happen to hang out in Lincoln County together, where football dynasties continue to flourish. The 3A Braves won titles in 2015, 2016, 2018 and 2019, while the 1A Panthers won theirs in 2010, 2011, 2013 and 2014. Together, they’ve combined for 34 titles (22 for Cokeville, 12 for Star Valley).

8. Multiple dynasties stake their claims: In all, 24 programs won state titles in the 2010s, down slightly from the 26 in the 2000s and the 25 in the 19990s who won it all. In addition to the programs already mentioned (Sheridan, Natrona, Star Valley, Powell, Cokeville and Kaycee), five other programs won at least two state championships. Big Horn won four state titles, Mountain View and Snake River won three apiece and Cody and Pine Bluffs each won a pair.

What was your biggest takeaway from the past 10 years of football in the Equality State? Leave a comment and let’s talk about the ways.

–patrick

One of the cooler things about soccer in the United Kingdom is how some of the stadiums are named. Places like Elland Road, Bramall Lane, Portman Road and others are named for the street or road they’re on rather than for some corporate sponsor, some dead person or some mascot.

I think that brings a certain amount of charm to the grounds — the name of the stadium is also how to get there. Quaint AND convenient.

If we were to do that for Wyoming high school football fields, the results would vary. Some stadiums would end up with really cool names. Others, as you’ll see, are worse off for shooting for this kind of quaintness.

Here’s how Wyoming football stadiums would be renamed with this occasionally used U.K. method, ranked from worst name to best name. As you’ll see, there is indeed one clear winner:

SchoolU.K. stadium name
LymanI-80 Business Loop
PowellRoad 8
Rocky MountainUS 310
FarsonHighway 28
Torrington25th Avenue
SundanceSixth Street
Snake RiverNorth Street
Ten SleepOld 10 Sleep Highway
NewcastleCasper Avenue
BuffaloMain Street
Cheyenne CentralEducation Drive
ThermopolisSenior Avenue
WrightWright Boulevard
CodyCody Avenue
Tongue RiverTongue River Road
Big PineyPiney Drive
Kelly WalshWalsh Drive
LuskPearl Street
LingleCanAm Highway
ShoshoniCalifornia Street
UptonBoundary Street
DouglasSonora Avenue
Rock SpringsJames Drive
SoutheastLacy Street
MeeteetseHayes Avenue
KayceeHolt Avenue
HannaHarrison Street
WheatlandRowley Street
DuboisCarson Street
RawlinsBrooks Street
Thunder BasinChristinck Avenue
HulettSager Avenue
MidwestEllison Avenue
Pine BluffsMaple Street
NatronaAsh Street
SaratogaElm Avenue
RivertonSunset Drive
LaramieBoulder Drive
CokevilleSage Street
WorlandWashakie Avenue
LanderTiger Drive
Wind RiverCougar Drive
GilletteCamel Drive
Star ValleyWarrior Way
GreybullRailroad Street
Mountain ViewRiver Bend Drive
PinedaleValley Road
EncampmentMacFarlane Avenue
JacksonGregory Lane
KemmererDel Rio Road
RiversideArlington Avenue
SheridanMydland Road
LovellGreat Western Avenue
MoorcroftLittle Horn Avenue
BurnsWyoming Avenue
GuernseyWyoming Avenue
EvanstonChamps Avenue
Big HornHigh Street
Cheyenne SouthAllison Road
St. StephensMission Road
Wyoming IndianBlue Sky Highway
Cheyenne EastForest Drive
Green RiverHitching Post Drive
BurlingtonFarmer Boulevard
GlenrockOregon Trail
NSILane Lane

Note: Some Wyoming football stadiums are bound on two, three or four sides by streets. I tried to pick the street closest to the stadium parking lot and/or the name that sounded the coolest.

–patrick

Two players set unofficial single-season statistical records for Wyoming high school football in 2019 — one breaking the single-season receiving yards mark and the other setting a new standard for defensive points.

Meanwhile, three Class 4A quarterbacks finished in the top five all-time in passing yards.

The individual records page lists the unofficial top 10 performances in a variety of single-game and single-season categories. This year’s updates were based on final season statistics posted at Wyopreps.

Season records set in 2019:

  • Cheyenne East’s Chance Aumiller set a single-season record with 1,121 receiving yards.
  • Wright’s Dax Yeradi also set a season record with 331 defensive points. Thunder Basin’s Caleb Driskill finished third with 293 defensive points and Cokeville’s Nate Barnes was sixth all-time with 287.
  • Cheyenne East’s Graedyn Buell finished second all-time with 2,989 passing yards. Cheyenne Central’s Dawson Macleary was close behind in third all-time with 2,621 yards, while Thunder Basin’s Mason Hamilton was fifth all-time with 2,561 yards.
  • Jackson’s Jeydon Cox finished fifth all-time with 2,038 rushing yards. He’s the first Wyoming running back to finish a career with multiple 2,000-yard seasons.

Single-game records set in 2019 include the following:

  • Buell notched the seventh-best passing game of all time with a 390-yard passing game against Natrona on Sept. 27. In the same game, Aumiller finished with 237 receiving yards, good for fifth-best all-time.
  • On the same day, Hamilton threw for 382 yards against Gillette, 10th-best all time.
  • Also on Sept. 27, Burns’ Boe Clayson ran for 339 yards against Wheatland, tied for eighth-best all-time.
  • Big Horn’s Will Pelissier turned in the ninth-best receiving performance in state history with a 214-yard effort against Southeast.

Keep in mind that these listings are unofficial but as complete as they can be at this point. As always, I’m interested in hearing about games or seasons that should be on the records list that I’ve missed. If you’ve got any such games or seasons to add, let me know by leaving a comment here or emailing me at pschmiedt@yahoo.com.

–patrick

The 2019 season is done, and we have five more champions.

Four went undefeated — Snake River in 1A six-man, Big Horn in 1A 11-man, Mountain View in 2A and Star Valley in 3A. Sheridan, meanwhile, won the 4A title with an 11-1 record after beating previously unbeaten Thunder Basin 35-26.

There are a host of places where you can read about these games, with info from people who were at the games. That wasn’t me — in case you weren’t aware, I live in California these days, and making it to Laramie in mid-November with work is tough — but I watched as much as I could of the championships via the live video streams online. I do miss attending championship weekend in Laramie, but I don’t miss the snow.

Things I noticed from the title games, and the season:

Both Big Horn and Star Valley will carry long winning streaks into next season. Big Horn has won 22 games in a row, including its 55-7 demolition of Cokeville in the Class 1A 11-man title game, while Star Valley has won 21 in a row with its 49-13 thumping of Powell in the Class 3A championship.

Big Horn has also won 15 consecutive home games, as well as 15 consecutive road games. The Rams’ 15 straight road victories is within sniffing distance of the top five such streaks all-time; however, Natrona has won 18 straight home games and Mountain View has won 17 straight at home.

+++

With its 71-38 victory in the Class 1A six-man title game, Snake River has now scored in 105 consecutive games, the best active streak in the state but still well short of the state record of 175, set by Cokeville. Snake River hasn’t been shut out since resurrecting its program in 2009.

Snake River was scored on in the title game, leaving the Rattlers tied for the state’s longest shutout streak at nine with three other programs. However, the Rattlers are the only team to have ever done so at six-man, and the only one to have ever done so after World War II. It’s an unbelievable run that I don’t know we’ll ever see again.

+++

Even though they lost the Class 1A 11-man title game, the Cokeville Panthers notched their 32nd consecutive winning season, a total that’s twice as good as any other program in the state. Meanwhile, Laramie finished with its 19th consecutive losing season, the second-longest such streak in state history.

+++

Despite losing the 1A six-man title game, Hanna finished the season with 795 points, second-best all-time. The Miners also finished with 72.27 points per game, the highest mark in state history.

Class 2A champ Mountain View didn’t score a lot in the title game, beating Buffalo 24-14, but the Buffalos finished with 549 points this season, second-best all time for 11-man teams. Their average of 49.91 points per game is third-best all time. Meanwhile, Class 1A 11-man champ Big Horn averaged 49 ppg, fourth-best all time, and had 539 total points, tied for fourth-highest in the state’s 11-man annals.

Several other efforts — some good, some not so good — ended up on the list of scoring records.

+++

Cokeville coach Todd Dayton will reach a heck of a milestone in the first game of the 2020 season. Right now, Dayton has 399 games to his credit; the first of 2020 will be his 400th as a head coach. Similarly, Natrona coach Steve Harshman needs seven more games to reach No. 300 in his Wyoming career. Dayton and Harshman rank 1-2 in Wyoming history in career victories, with Dayton way out in front with 335 and Harshman second with 207. This season, Harshman passed John E. Deti, who has 205 victories, for the No. 2 spot. They’re the only three coaches in state history with more than 200 career victories.

Meanwhile, Lander coach John Scott now has 102 victories in his Wyoming career; he became the 27th coach to join the 100-victory club. Two more coaches could join that group in 2020, as Upton-Sundance’s Andy Garland finished this season with 93 career victories and Cheyenne East’s Chad Goff emerged with 92.

+++

Here are the results of my picks from title-game weekend, this season and my “career”:

Last week: 5-0 (100 percent). This season: 250-57 (81 percent). The past 15 years: 3,584-887 (80 percent).

+++

Just because the 2019 season is done doesn’t mean we’re done here. Be sure to follow wyoming-football.com on Facebook or Twitter, or both. I’ll be sharing all kinds of offseason news, including coaching changes and peeks ahead to 2020, as well as all kinds of nerdy stuff related to Wyoming high school football (and occasionally other stuff I hope you find interesting).

The site has been updated with all the information I have available for 2019. Postseason recognition is yet to come — the all-state, Super 25 and all-America listings will be updated with that info when it becomes available — and I’m planning a couple other small tweaks to what’s here, too. If you see anything that’s incorrect or missing, let me know.

Finally, if you like what you see here, consider a page sponsorship. I truly appreciate all the sponsors who have already supported the site, but I also have room for more. I have to pay for my web space, and sponsorships help keep me from having to pay for the site out of my own pocket. For $20 a year, you can sponsor a page. If you like having on-demand results of 25,007 Wyoming high school football games across 5,449 team seasons — and you appreciate the work that went into it — then toss me a Jackson.

–patrick

For first-year head coaches in Wyoming high school football, it’s not uncommon to see a coach find immediate success.

In all, 31 coaches in Wyoming high school football — including current Big Horn coach Kirk McLaughlin — started their coaching careers with an undefeated season (with at least four games in the season).

However, maintaining that success has been tricky.

Of the 31 coaches who went undefeated (four or more games) in their first season, 14 of them didn’t return to coach the next season. Of the remaining 17, six posted losing records the following season.

The only other coach to go undefeated his first two seasons as head coach (minimum four games per season) is Joseph Weller, who led Albin to a 5-0 season in 1942 and a 4-0 season in 1943. Those were Weller’s only two seasons as a head football coach in Wyoming.

That brings us to McLaughlin.

McLaughlin started his head coaching career in Wyoming with an 11-0 season in 2018 followed up by a 2019 campaign that, so far, is 10-0, with the Class 1A 11-man state championship game against Cokeville scheduled for Saturday in Laramie.

The 21 consecutive victories to start a head coaching career in Wyoming is a state record.

Prior to McLaughlin, the coach who started his Wyoming head coaching career with the most consecutive victories was Jim Rooks. Rooks led Jackson to a 9-0 season his first season in 1981 and then won his first six in 1982 before losing to Star Valley in the second-to-last game of the 1982 season — notching 15 straight victories before a loss.

Third on the list is Talbot Rudolph, who posted 11 consecutive victories to start his career in one of the most circuitous paths a coach has ever taken. He started his Wyoming career with a 7-0 season at Pine Bluffs in 1941, then went 1-0 in the only game I can find for Big Piney in 1942. I don’t know where he was in 1943… but in 1944, he was coaching again, this time at the Heart Mountain internment camp, where he went 3-1 (winning the first three games to extend his start to 11 consecutive victories).

Three other coaches posted 10 consecutive victories to start their Wyoming head coaching careers — Lou Maiben (10 straight at Byron in 1954 and 1955), Tony Rouse (10 straight at Kaycee in 2017) and Bill Sollars (10 straight at Shoshoni in 1959).

–patrick

Here’s a quick look at the playoff scenarios for Wyoming high school football teams entering Week 8 of the 2019 season:

Class 4A
Week 8 games affecting playoff seeding: Cheyenne East at Sheridan; Cheyenne South at Cheyenne Central; Gillette at Kelly Walsh; Rock Springs at Natrona; Thunder Basin at Laramie.
Thunder Basin: In. No. 1 seed.
Sheridan: In. No. 2 seed with victory. No. 3 seed with loss.
Cheyenne East: In. No. 2 seed with victory. No. 3 seed with loss and Natrona loss. No. 4 seed (score differential to break) with loss, Central victory and Natrona victory (East is second in differential tiebreaker in this scenario). No. 4 seed with loss, South victory and Natrona victory.
Natrona: In. No. 3 seed with victory, Sheridan victory and South victory. No. 4 seed with victory and East victory. No. 5 seed (score differential to break) with victory, Sheridan victory and Central victory (Natrona is third in differential tiebreaker in this scenario). No. 6 seed with loss.
Cheyenne Central: In. No. 3 seed (score differential to break) with victory, Natrona victory and Sheridan victory (Central wins in differential tiebreaker in this scenario). No. 4 seed with victory, Rock Springs victory and Sheridan victory. No. 4 seed with victory and East victory. No. 4 seed with loss and Rock Springs victory. No. 5 seed with loss and Natrona victory.
Rock Springs: In. No. 5 seed with victory. No. 6 seed with loss.
Gillette: Neither in nor out. No. 7 seed with victory. No. 8 seed with loss and Thunder Basin victory. Tie for 7-8-out-out seeding (four-way tiebreaker to break, likely a coin flip) with loss, South victory and Laramie victory. Out (via highest-ranked three-way tiebreaker) with loss, Central victory and Laramie victory.
Cheyenne South: Neither in nor out. No. 8 seed with victory and Gillette victory. Tie for 7-8-out-out seeding (four-way tiebreaker to break, likely a coin flip) with victory, Kelly Walsh victory and Laramie victory. Out with victory, Kelly Walsh victory and Thunder Basin victory. Out with loss. (Laramie wins score differential tiebreaker with South loss, Gillette victory and Thunder Basin victory.)
Kelly Walsh: Neither in nor out. No. 7 seed with victory and Thunder Basin victory. Tie for 7-8-out-out seeding (four-way tiebreaker to break, likely a coin flip) with victory, South victory and Laramie victory. No. 8 seed (via highest-ranked three-way tiebreaker) with victory, Central victory and Laramie victory. Out with loss and either South or Laramie victory. Tie for 8-out-out seeding (score differential to break) with loss, Central victory and Thunder Basin victory.
Laramie: Neither in nor out. No. 7 seed (via highest-ranked three-way tiebreaker) with victory, Kelly Walsh victory and Central victory. No. 8 seed with victory, Gillette victory and Central victory. Tie for 7-8-out-out seeding (four-way tiebreaker to break, likely a coin flip) with victory, Kelly Walsh victory and South victory. Out with victory, Gillette victory and South victory. No. 8 seed with loss, Gillette victory and Central victory (Laramie wins score differential tiebreaker in this scenario). Out with loss, Gillette victory and South victory. Out with loss and Kelly Walsh victory.

Class 3A East
Week 8 games affecting playoff seeding: Lander at Worland; Riverton at Douglas.
Lander: In. No. 1 seed with victory. Tie for 1-2-3 seeds (score differential to break) with loss and Riverton victory (entering week, tiebreaker is Riverton +8, Lander +2, Worland -10). No. 2 seed with loss and Douglas victory.
Worland: In. No. 1 seed with victory and Douglas victory. Tie for 1-2-3 seeds (score differential to break) with victory and Riverton victory (entering week, tiebreaker is Riverton +8, Lander +2, Worland -10). Tie for 2-3-4 seeds (score differential to break) with loss and Douglas victory (entering week, tiebreaker is Riverton +10, Worland +2, Douglas -12). No. 3 seed with loss and Riverton victory.
Douglas: In. Tie for 2-3-4 seeds (score differential to break) with victory and Lander victory (entering week, tiebreaker is Riverton +10, Worland +2, Douglas -12). No. 3 seed with victory and Worland victory. No. 4 seed with loss.
Riverton: In. Tie for 1-2-3 seeds (score differential to break) with victory and Worland victory (entering week, tiebreaker is Riverton +8, Lander +2, Worland -10). No. 2 seed with victory and Lander victory. Tie for 2-3-4 seeds (score differential to break) with loss and Lander victory (entering week, tiebreaker is Riverton +10, Worland +2, Douglas -12). No. 4 seed with loss and Worland victory.
Rawlins, Torrington: Out.

Class 3A West
Week 8 games affecting playoff seeding: Powell at Jackson.
Star Valley: In. No. 1 seed.
Cody: In. No. 2 seed.
Jackson, Powell: In. No. 3 seed with victory. No. 4 seed with loss.
Evanston, Green River: Out.

Class 2A East
Week 8 games affecting playoff seeding: Thermopolis at Burns.
Buffalo: In. No. 1 seed.
Burns, Thermopolis: In. No. 2 seed with victory. No. 3 seed with loss.
Wheatland: In. No. 4 seed.
Glenrock, Moorcroft, Newcastle: Out.

Class 2A West
Week 8 games affecting playoff seeding: Big Piney at Lyman; Kemmerer at Lovell.
Mountain View: In. No. 1 seed.
Big Piney: In. No. 2 seed with victory. No. 3 seed with loss and Kemmerer victory. Tie for 2-3-4 seeds (score differential to break) with loss and Lovell victory (entering week, tiebreaker is Big Piney +6, Lyman -2, Lovell -4).
Lovell: In. Tie for 2-3-4 seeds (score differential to break) with victory and Lyman victory (entering week, tiebreaker is Big Piney +6, Lyman -2, Lovell -4). No. 3 seed with Big Piney victory. No. 4 seed with loss and Lyman victory.
Lyman: In. No. 2 seed with victory and Kemmerer victory. Tie for 2-3-4 seeds (score differential to break) with victory and Lovell victory (entering week, tiebreaker is Big Piney +6, Lyman -2, Lovell -4). No. 4 seed with loss.
Pinedale, Greybull, Kemmerer: Out.

Class 1A 11-man East
Week 8 games affecting playoff seeding: Big Horn at Southeast.
Big Horn: In. No. 1 seed with victory. Tie for 1-2-3 seeds (score differential to break) with loss (entering week, tiebreaker is Big Horn +12, Upton-Sundance 0, Southeast -12).
Upton-Sundance: In. No. 2 seed with Big Horn victory. Tie for 1-2-3 seeds (score differential to break) with Southeast victory (entering week, tiebreaker is Big Horn +12, Upton-Sundance 0, Southeast -12).
Southeast: In. Tie for 1-2-3 seeds (score differential to break) with Southeast victory (entering week, tiebreaker is Big Horn +12, Upton-Sundance 0, Southeast -12). No. 3 seed with loss.
Wright: In. No. 4 seed
Lusk, Pine Bluffs, Tongue River: Out.

Class 1A 11-man West
Week 8 games affecting playoff seeding: none.
Cokeville: In. No. 1 seed.
Shoshoni: In. No. 2 seed.
Rocky Mountain: In. No. 3 seed.
Wind River: In. No. 4 seed.
Wyoming Indian: Out.

Class 1A six-man East
Week 8 games affecting playoff seeding: Hanna at Guernsey; NSI at Kaycee; Lingle at Hulett.
Hanna: In. No. 1 seed.
Hulett, Lingle: In. No. 2 seed with victory. No. 3 seed with loss.
Kaycee: Neither in nor out. No. 4 seed with victory. No. 4 seed with loss and Hanna victory. Out with loss and Guernsey victory.
Guernsey: Neither in nor out. No. 4 seed with victory and NSI victory. Out with victory and Kaycee victory. Out with loss.
Midwest, NSI: Out.
Saratoga: Ineligible for playoffs.

Class 1A six-man West
Week 8 games affecting playoff seeding: Burlington at Riverside; St. Stephens at Farson.
Snake River: In. No. 1 seed.
Farson: In. No. 2 seed with victory and Riverside victory. No. 2 seed (score differential to break) with loss and Riverside victory (Farson wins score differential tiebreaker and/or highest ranking victory tiebreaker in this scenario). No. 3 seed with Burlington victory.
Burlington: In. No. 2 seed with victory. No. 3 seed (score differential to break) with loss and St. Stephens victory (Burlington is second in differential tiebreaker in this scenario). No. 4 seed with loss and Farson victory.
Meeteetse: In. No. 3 seed with Riverside victory and Farson victory. No. 4 seed (score differential to break) with Riverside victory and St. Stephens victory (Meeteetse is third in differential tiebreaker in this scenario). No. 4 seed with Burlington victory.
St. Stephens, Dubois: Out.
Riverside: Ineligible for playoffs.

Post updated 6:56 p.m. MDT Oct. 21 to reflect Rocky Mountain’s forfeit victory against Wyoming Indian in Week 8.
Post updated 12:09 p.m. MDT Oct. 20 to reflect winners and current tiebreaker scores for potential three-way ties affected by scoring differential. Post updated 10:34 p.m. MDT Oct. 19 to reflect updated scenarios in 2A West, 1A six-man East and 1A six-man West.

–patrick

Here’s a quick look at broad playoff scenarios entering Week 7 of the 2019 Wyoming high school football season:

Class 4A
In: Thunder Basin, Sheridan, Cheyenne East, Natrona, Cheyenne Central, Rock Springs.
Neither in nor out: Cheyenne South, Gillette, Kelly Walsh, Laramie.
Out: No one.
Can the top seed be decided this week? Yep. Thunder Basin can earn the No. 1 seed with a victory against Kelly Walsh.
Break it down for me: The bottom four teams in 4A are all 1-6, chasing the final two playoff seeds. Gillette is probably in the best position to control its own destiny, as the Camels face South and Kelly Walsh while the other three schools play at least one team from the top six (and Laramie plays a pair) in the final two weeks.

Class 3A East
In: Lander.
Neither in nor out: Douglas, Riverton, Worland, Rawlins, Torrington.
Out: No one.
Can the top seed be decided this week? Only if Lander beats Douglas and Torrington upsets Worland; if so, then Lander will be the top seed.
Break it down for me: Rawlins and Torrington are both 0-3 and play each other in Week 8. They both need victories in Week 7 to stay alive. Meanwhile, Douglas, Riverton and Worland are all fighting it out at 2-1.

Class 3A West
In: Star Valley, Cody.
Neither in nor out: Jackson, Powell, Green River, Evanston.
Out: No one.
Can the top seed be decided this week? It WILL be decided this week; the winner of Friday’s game between Star Valley and Cody will be the West’s No. 1 seed.
Break it down for me: After the top seed, a lot is up in the air with Jackson, Powell and Green River all 1-2 and Evanston still in it at 0-3 but needing some help. Powell and Green River play each other this week, and that will kickstart the sorting process.

Class 2A East
In: Buffalo.
Neither in nor out: Thermopolis, Burns, Wheatland, Glenrock, Moorcroft, Newcastle.
Out: No one.
Can the top seed be decided this week? It’s already decided; Buffalo is the East’s top seed.
Break it down for me: I’ve already talked about how crazy the 2A East is. Thermopolis, Burns and Wheatland are in the best shape to reach the postseason, and Glenrock, Moorcroft and Newcastle (all 1-3) will need some victories and some help to sneak in.

Class 2A West
In: Mountain View, Big Piney.
Neither in nor out: Lovell, Lyman, Pinedale, Greybull, Kemmerer.
Out: No one.
Can the top seed be decided this week? Sure can be; Mountain View earns the top seed by beating winless Kemmerer this week.
Break it down for me: Kemmerer has the most difficult climb; at 0-4, the Rangers need to beat No. 1 Mountain View this week and get some help to tie the right teams to force a tiebreaker. Beyond that, the rest of the conference is a big, muddled mess right now as four other teams chase two spots.

Class 1A 11-man East
In: Big Horn, Upton-Sundance.
Neither in nor out: Southeast, Wright, Lusk, Pine Bluffs.
Out: Tongue River.
Can the top seed be decided this week? Big Horn would win the top seed by defeating Lusk paired with a Southeast loss to Wright; otherwise, it’ll be decided in Week 8.
Break it down for me: In the chase for the final two playoff spots, Southeast and Wright are most comfortable, at 3-1 and 2-2, respectively. That leaves Lusk and Pine Bluffs, both at 1-3, trying to leap ahead of Wright for the fourth spot. Lusk and Pine Bluffs play each other in Week 8, and they’ll both need upsets in Week 7 (Lusk over Big Horn, Pine Bluffs over Upton-Sundance) to keep pace with the Panthers. And Wright holds the tiebreaker over both of them.

Class 1A 11-man West
In: No one.
Neither in nor out: Everyone.
Out: No one.
Can the top seed be decided this week? Simply, no.
Break it down for me: This conference is a bit tricky, as Cokeville and Wyoming Indian don’t play each other this season. But Shoshoni is in position to be the No. 2 seed behind the Panthers, and Rocky Mountain and Wind River are potentially Nos. 3 and 4… unless upsets happen, like they did last year.

Class 1A six-man East
In: Hanna, Hulett.
Neither in nor out: Lingle, Kaycee, Guernsey, NSI.
Out: Midwest.
Ineligible: Saratoga.
Can the top seed be decided this week? Sure can; Hanna will be the top seed with a victory against Kaycee in Week 7.
Break it down for me: The chase for the final two spots really boils down to Lingle, Kaycee and Guernsey. Lingle is in a better spot, being 3-2 to Kaycee and Guernsey’s 2-3. This week’s Lingle-Guernsey game will be crucial. Meanwhile, NSI is the longest long shot, needing victories in the final two weeks and a LOT of help just to force a tiebreaker.

Class 1A six-man West
In: Snake River.
Neither in nor out: Farson, Burlington, Meeteetse, St. Stephens, Dubois.
Out: No one.
Ineligible: Riverside.
Can the top seed be decided this week? It’s already been decided — Snake River will be the top seed out of the West.
Break it down for me: Farson at 3-1 needs only one win to secure a playoff spot. After that, Burlington at 2-2 and Meeteetse at 2-3 are in the best positions for the postseason. St. Stephens at 1-3 needs an upset or two, while Dubois at 0-4 REALLY needs some victories and some help, although the Rams still mathematically alive.

–patrick

Some big changes were coming to the Wyoming football landscape in 2020, with or without shifts due to reclassification.

But reclassification in and of itself will bring some changes, as well.

With Class 1A 11-man football changing to nine-man next fall, several schools have petitioned to opt up to Class 2A to keep the 11-man version of the sport going at their school. Between petitions and enrollment changes, as many as 12 schools could play football in a different classification next fall.

With the reclassification numbers released to schools by the Wyoming High School Activities Association during the organization’s district meetings this month, some schools will have easier decisions than others.

Before we dive into the breakdowns for each sport, let’s take a look at the “Average Daily Membership” numbers — projected grade 9-12 enrollment numbers — that the WHSAA will use for enrollment-based classification:

1. Kelly Walsh, 1,996.72
2. Natrona, 1,943.63
3. Rock Springs, 1,642.46
4. Cheyenne East, 1,513.53
5. Cheyenne South, 1,492.05
6. Cheyenne Central, 1,410.04
7. Campbell County, 1,289.55
8. Thunder Basin, 1,238.04
9. Laramie, 1,159.28
10. Sheridan, 1,093.16
11. Jackson, 869.91
12. Evanston, 846.25
13. Star Valley, 816.05
14. Green River, 764.81
15. Riverton, 748.15
16. Cody, 619.23
17. Powell, 586.88
18. Lander, 559.10
19. Douglas, 543.84
20. Rawlins, 473.09
21. Worland, 442.94
22. Buffalo, 356.91
23. Torrington, 352.13
24. Pinedale, 341.15
25. Wheatland, 282.30
26. Mountain View, 275.54
27. Newcastle, 262.35
28. Lyman, 237.37
29. Burns, 229.00
30. Lovell, 226.03
31. Thermopolis, 213.29
32. Kemmerer, 188.70
33. Moorcroft, 188.08
34. Glenrock, 182.35
35. Tongue River, 174.00
36. Big Piney, 160.72
37. Greybull, 147.59
38. Wyoming Indian, 146.95
39. Rocky Mountain, 129.86
40. Big Horn, 127.86
41. Wind River, 127.01
42. Wright, 126.78
43. Sundance, 123.11
44. Shoshoni, 122.63
45. Pine Bluffs, 112.46
46. Lusk, 90.67
47. Riverside, 87.27
48. St. Stephens, 82.74
49. Saratoga, 82.62
50. Lingle, 78.54
51. Cokeville, 77.41
52. Southeast, 76.77
53. Burlington, 76.41
54. Guernsey-Sunrise, 69.39
55. Upton, 66.68
56. Normative Services, 65.00
57. Hanna, 62.87
58. Midwest, 61.00
59. Farson, 57.90
60. Hulett, 56.57
61. Kaycee, 52.82
62. Snake River, 51.40
63. Fort Washakie, 49.93
64. Encampment, 43.44
65. Dubois, 42.79
66. Arapaho Charter, 40.01
67. Meeteetse, 34.50
68. Arvada-Clearmont, 31.06
69. Ten Sleep, 31.04
70. Rock River, 27.67
71. Glendo, 16.42
72. Chugwater, 7.65

Here’s a quick look at how reclassification will likely affect each sport (with football’s changes noted at the end of this post):

BASKETBALL, VOLLEYBALL, TRACK (16-16-16-rest): The only likely change in 3A comes in the Southwest. Kemmerer and Big Piney will switch places, with Kemmerer moving up to Class 3A and Big Piney down to Class 2A.

The only other anticipated change comes with St. Stephens and Southeast, as St. Stephens jumps to 2A and Southeast moves down to 1A.

In 2A, it’s probable (and at this point, my conjecture) that Wright will move to the SE District to take Southeast’s place, Tongue River will move to the NE District to take Wright’s place, and St. Stephens will slide into the NW to fill Tongue River’s spot.

No changes are anticipated for 4A in these sports.

CROSS COUNTRY, GOLF, SWIMMING, WRESTLING (12-16-rest): These three-class (cross country, golf, wrestling) and two-class (swimming) sports will likely see only one change. Jackson and Green River will swap spots in Class 4A, with Jackson moving up and Green River moving down.

SOCCER (14-rest): Soccer will see no classification changes prompted by enrollment.

OTHER SPORTS: Wyoming’s remaining sports have only one classification, which makes this discussion moot to them.

Laird said no other schools or programs in any sports except for football have put forth opt-up or opt-down requests to the WHSAA. However, football has prompted plenty of such requests. … And that brings us to…

FOOTBALL (10-12-14-14-rest): Purely by enrollment differences, several schools will change classifications for 2020.

  • Buffalo and Torrington will flip-flop their spots, with Buffalo moving back to 3A and Torrington to 2A.
  • Tongue River and Greybull will also trade, with Tongue River moving to 2A and Greybull to 1A.
  • Lingle and St. Stephens will be classified as nine-man programs by enrollment and move up.
  • Riverside and Saratoga, currently opting down to play six-man schedules, are scheduled to move to the nine-man division.
  • Southeast will be classified as a six-man school by enrollment (but has requested to opt up).

Then it gets messy, as teams opt up from nine-man (or six-man) classifications to remain 11-man programs.

Five schools — Big Horn, Cokeville, Upton-Sundance, Southeast and Moorcroft — have submitted opt-up or opt-down requests to the WHSAA, WHSAA Commissioner Ron Laird said via email to wyoming-football.com on Tuesday.

With nine-man’s start at the 1A level, two programs — Big Horn and Cokeville — have asked the WHSAA to opt up from nine-man to 2A, with Upton-Sundance also joining 2A per its co-op. Additionally, Southeast has requested to opt up from six-man to nine-man.

Meanwhile, Moorcroft has asked to opt down from Class 2A to Class 1A nine-man. Laird said officials from Moorcroft are scheduled to address the WHSAA board next week to ask for playoff eligibility.

If all opt-up and opt-down requests are approved — which won’t be official until passed twice by the WHSAA board of directors in meetings in both September and November — a total of 12 schools could play in different classifications in 2020, not including the schools staying in 1A and making the change from 11-man to nine-man.

No changes are slated for Class 4A football.

WHSAA Associate Commissioner Trevor Wilson provided a tentative conference alignment via email on Tuesday. However, all conference alignments must be approved by the schools and won’t be finalized until the WHSAA’s second board meeting of the school year in November.

TENTATIVE conference alignments include:

4A: No changes.

3A: Buffalo replaces Torrington in the East; no other changes.

2A East: Big Horn, Burns, Glenrock, Newcastle, Tongue River, Torrington, Upton-Sundance, Wheatland.

2A West: Big Piney, Cokeville, Kemmerer, Lovell, Lyman, Mountain View, Pinedale, Thermopolis.

1A nine-man East: Lingle, Lusk, Moorcroft, Pine Bluffs, Saratoga, Southeast, Wright.

1A nine-man West: Greybull, Riverside, Rocky Mountain, St. Stephens, Shoshoni, Wind River, Wyoming Indian.

1A six-man East: Guernsey, Kaycee, Hulett, Hanna, NSI, Midwest.

1A six-man West: Burlington, Encampment, Dubois, Farson, Meeteetse, Snake River, Ten Sleep.

–patrick

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