Photo of Ned Turner posing in a starting position.
Edwin “Ned” Turner poses for a photo while at the University of Michigan in 1932. Turner, a graduate of Natrona County High School in Casper, ran in the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles, placing fifth in the 800-meter run. Photo courtesy of the Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan.

Exactly 89 years ago today, a Casper native took to the Olympic track at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and held his own with the best runners in the world.

Today, though, Ned Turner’s accomplishments are nearly forgotten.

Edwin T. “Ned” Turner finished fifth in the 800-meter run at the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles. He was one of the first, if not the first, Wyoming athletes to compete in the Olympics, a list that includes celebrated names like Rulon Gardner, John Godina, Lance Deal, Heather Moody, Jesseca Cross, Jennifer Nichols and a handful of others.

Turner was just 19 when he ran in the Olympics. A junior at the University of Michigan, Turner had made his mark with guts. A Casper Tribune-Herald article from 1952 noted that “Ned was not a sprint finisher, as are many middle distance runners, but he was noted for his strength, endurance, and untiring running ability.”

Ned Turner's yearbook photo
Edwin “Ned” Turner’s photo from the 1929 Natrona County High School yearbook.

Despite his world-class finish in the Olympics, Turner was never an NCAA champion at Michigan. Moreover, he was only once a Wyoming state track champion, winning the 440-yard run as a junior at Natrona in 1928. He had appendicitis as a senior and missed the entire track and field season while recovering.

But at Michigan, Turner grew and matured; after all, he was just 16 when he graduated from NCHS. He qualified for the Olympics by finishing third in the AAU championships, which doubled as the U.S. Olympic trials, in mid-July. Once at the Olympics, Turner finished third in his opening heat, good enough to make the final race.

The 800-meter final itself put Turner in a field that saw almost everyone, including Turner, run a time that was better than the gold-medal time from the 1928 Olympic 800-meter run. Great Britain’s Tommy Hampson ran a then-world record time of 1 minute, 49.7 seconds to win the race. Turner finished fifth in 1:52.5.

You can watch the race on YouTube here. Turner is wearing a white tank and white shorts and has dark hair, but it’s hard to make him out in the footage as that was the attire for several racers. See full race and heat results here.

Turner led a full, but short, life after his Olympic opportunity. He graduated from Michigan in 1933 and turned to business. In 1952, an article in the Casper Tribune-Herald described Turner as “a successful business executive” in Michigan. Turner worked in a variety of industries, including industrial machinery and paper, and lived in New York in addition to Michigan. Like many young men of his time, his career was interrupted during World War II, when he served in the Navy. Turner died Aug. 17, 1967, in Michigan, a month short of his 55th birthday.

As Wyomingites watch the Tokyo Summer Olympics this month, let’s make sure the name “Turner” stays in the conversation.

–patrick

Wyoming, meet Bob Wood. Again, for the first time.

Bob Wood, Ten Sleep distance runner.

One of Wyoming’s most accomplished high school distance runners — and the pioneer of a feat that’s quite uncommon — had his accomplishments more or less lost to time.

A 1967 graduate of Ten Sleep High School, Wood carved out his Wyoming track legacy by becoming what I believe is the state’s first four-time individual event champion. He won the Class C mile run four years in a row from 1964-67.

But this accomplishment somehow was lost or forgotten to history. Only in the last two weeks did I add Wood and Deaver’s Jim Gomendi, the Class C champion in the 880-yard run from 1969-72, to my list of four-time event champions, a list that only includes six people and seven events over 99 years of state track and field history.

The problem? I don’t know if that list is complete.

Inspired by uncovering Wood’s accomplishments — and by the upcoming 100th anniversary of the state track and field meet, which is coming in 2022 — I have renewed my efforts to uncover all the individual event champions for all of the state track and field meets back to their start nearly 100 years ago.

Of the 7,856 individual event and relay champions since 1922, I have found 7,670, including 100% of the girls champions.

I’m almost 98% there. And I’m asking for your help with the remaining 2%.

Below, I’ve outlined what I’m missing: the 210 event champions, the 121 first names and the 33 marks or times I’m missing from completing this record of Wyoming’s state track and field champions.

The hope this that, once this project is done, no one else will slip through the cracks in the record-keeping like Bob Wood once did.

Email me your updates to pschmiedt@yahoo.com or leave a comment on this post letting me know any missing info that will help complete this project. To see the project in full to this point, visit the Wyoming track and field champions archive.

+++

Lists last updated 9:30 a.m. MDT June 23. Names, times/marks and events that have been found have been removed from this post for clarity.

First names are missing for the following champions:
Mountain View: Sims, high jump, 1961.
Reliance: Jurich, discus/shot put, 1935.

Event winners and times/marks are missing for these years, classes and/or events:
1969 Class B: long jump.
1969 Class C: discus.

Finally, the winning times or marks are missing from the following:
1969 Class B: shot put (won by Byron’s Rick Tanner)
1951 Class B: 880 relay (won by Lyman)
1936 all-class: 880 relay (won by Natrona)
1927 all-class: 100 (won by Worland’s Carl Dir), mile medley relay (won by Thermopolis)

Thanks in advance for your help!

–patrick

Ten Sleep's Bob Wood in 1967
Ten Sleep’s Bob Wood in 1967, from his senior yearbook.

Bob Wood’s initial passion was basketball.

He only went out for track because his coach at Ten Sleep, Joe Daniel, asked him.

He only ran the mile because Daniel made freshmen run the mile; no one else on the team would.

However, by the end of Wood’s high school career in 1967, he was a four-time state champion in the mile; he is believed to be Wyoming’s first four-time event champion in track and field.

Wood’s success at Ten Sleep was just the start of the intertwining of his fate and his future, leading to his career as one of the most influential people in American distance running.

Auspicious start

Before Wood left Wyoming, made international running connections and established himself in high places, he dodged cow patties on a makeshift practice track in Ten Sleep.

In Wood’s first timed mile – a practice run on a marked-off cow pasture near the school – Wood ran the distance in 5 minutes, 15 seconds, “not knowing what I was doing,” he said.

Ten Sleep’s mile record at the time was 5:26.

Later that week, in his first high school meet on an actual track in Morton, Wood ran a 5:06, bettering the school record by 20 seconds.

By the state meet, Wood had continued to improve and was one of the favorites to win the mile in Class C, the 1960s equivalent of Class 1A. But he wasn’t THE favorite, so Wood and Daniel figured a fifth-place finish would be good.

At the midpoint of the race, Wood was in fifth, ready to meet expectations. Then the first-place runner dropped out of the race, puking.

All of a sudden, Wood was in fourth, and the favorite was out.

Expectations flipped, and Wood flipped the field. He started picking off runners one by one and took the lead for good on the last half of the final lap.

Down the final stretch, “I could hear my coach over everyone, saying, ‘You better win it now,'” Wood said. ” … I was just overwhelmed that I had won the thing.”

He wasn’t done winning.

As a sophomore, Wood fought off both a kidney infection and a bad midseason cold and, despite only running the mile once during the regular season, repeated as state champion.

Wood won both the Class B cross country championship and the Class C mile title as a junior, but by then, he started looking for more competition – and found it in Lander’s Nelson Moss. Even though the two ran in different classifications, they were Wyoming’s best distance runners, competing against each other.

Wood’s senior year, 1967, brought both a crowning achievement and a short-lived record.

With no Class C competition to push him, Wood set his own pace in the mile, hoping for a time that would hold up against Moss’s time. Wood finished in 4:29.9, a time that did more than just push his rival. It set an all-class state meet record.

The record lasted about 20 minutes, until the end of the Class AA race, when Moss notched a 4:26.6 to reset the all-class record Wood had just broken.

The newspaper reports the following day were filled with reports of the Wood-Moss mile record trade. No report mentioned that, most likely, Wood had just become Wyoming’s first four-time event champion, a feat that hadn’t been accomplished since the state meets started in 1922, and repeated since by only five other male high school athletes in Wyoming.

After Ten Sleep

Wood’s college career at the University of Utah never blossomed the way he hoped it would. He raced behind an all-American as a freshman, limiting his opportunities to be a frontrunner as he had in high school, and then took a two-year Mormon mission to Scotland.

After he returned, he fought injuries, and his motivation waned.

“I came back, but I never really had the fire,” Wood said.

Nevertheless, once his collegiate career was over, he found ways to stay involved in track and field. He was an assistant coach at Utah and also coached at the high school level in Utah. But when he was passed over to be Utah’s head track coach, Wood left coaching.

His next career move, though, kept him in track and field circles for years to come.

It all started with a conversation with distance runner Paul Cummings. Cummings was the NCAA champion in the mile while at BYU and was entering the world of professional running.

He needed an agent.

He told Wood: “You’re the only guy I trust.”

Wood hesitated but finally relented. He became Cummings’ agent. From there, Wood’s reputation, and his influence, in distance running grew. And grew. And grew.

Over his career, Wood represented hundreds of runners, including 54 Olympians from 22 different countries, although he eventually specialized in working with American runners. He used that influence to become an active part of USA Track and Field, serving as the head of long distance running and on the national executive committee from 1992 to 1997.

Wood remains proud that he ran his agency as a solo operation for four decades – no assistants, no partners – and represented some of the world’s best runners.

“They hire me because they want me, and that’s why I did what I did the way I did it,” Wood said.

Today, Wood is mostly retired but still represents a handful of runners with whom he has built close relationships.

More than his career, though, he’s proud of his family. He and his wife Kay have been married for more than 40 years, building their lives in the Salt Lake City area. He has three sons. Samuel, Seth and Isaac have molded their own careers, Samuel and Isaac around track and field, Seth with linguistics.

Wood had eased into a steady retirement rhythm until March 17, less than a month ago.

That’s when Wood had the first colonoscopy of his life.

The procedure led doctors to find a growth the size of a tangerine.

On March 30, Wood underwent surgery. Wood says the doctors “got it all,” and now he’s back home, with no further complications or necessary treatments in the foreseeable future.

When recalling his life, from his family to his track accomplishments to his career to his health, he often uses the same word: “Blessed.”

“I can’t complain, for a kid from Ten Sleep,” he said.

+++

Coming Friday: Bob Wood’s place in Wyoming track and field history is set, but others’ accomplishments have been lost to time. You can help fix that.

–patrick

Not long ago, I shared that I’ve been doing a lot of Wyoming track and field research, trying to find individual state champions back to 1922.

I shared the results of that research here. I found a lot, but not everything. So now I’m asking you, dear reader, for some help.

I need first names of these state track champions to help make these listings complete.

Y’all came through the last time I did this, in 2014. And I’m ready to ask for your help again.

First name needs are listed first; missing event champions are listed below that. As I receive updates, I will cross them off this list.

To submit names or missing information, leave a comment on this post or email me directly at pschmiedt@yahoo.com.

+++

Missing first names

BOYS
50
Class AA
: Hays, Riv, 1935; Dir, Wor, 1927; Cover, The, 1926; J. Driscall, The, 1925.

100
Class AA
: Dawson, Whe, 1948; Moon, Kem, 1945; Hays, Riv, 1935; Melinkovich, RS, 1934; Starman, RS, 1931; Dir, Wor, 1927; J. Driscall, The, 1925.
Class A: Bishop, Riv, 1954.
Class B: Pingrey, DF, 1960; Davinson, Kem, 1957; Garrett, Pin, 1951.

220
Class AA
: Dawson, Whe, 1948; Moon, Kem, 1945; Hays, Riv, 1935; Starman, RS, 1931; Dir, Wor, 1927; J. Driscall, The, 1925; Driscoll, The, 1924; Teninty, The, 1922.
Class B: Davinson, Kem, 1957; Berrier, Lym, 1951.

440
Class AA
: Hammer, StM, 1950; Anderson, GR, 1945; Jaycox, Pav, 1942; Raymon, GR, 1941; Ono, GR, 1940; Landman, CC, 1936; Knepper, Buf, 1935; Gamble, Riv, 1930; Turner, NC, 1928; Dir, Wor, 1927; Ingraham, The, 1926; Northrup, Pow, 1925; Ekdall, CC, 1924; Coleman, Lan, 1923; Hanson, Glk, 1922.
Class A: Fisher, Lus, 1970; Fowled, GR, 1954; Harkins, Wor, 1952.
Class B: Brown, Alb, 1965; Martinez, MV, 1962; Herrera, Lin, 1960; Reece, Lym, 1954; Gregory, HS, 1951.
Class C: Rademan, LaG, 1965; Brown, Alb, 1963; Rochlitz, Carp, 1960.

880
Class AA
: Dolan, Lar, 1970; Carroll, Pow, 1950; Wallace, StM, 1947; Sullenberger, Tor, 1946; Heron, Wor, 1944; Allen, Lar, 1942; Rogers, Dou, 1941; King, RS, 1936/1937; Pirtle, GR, 1935; Thatcher, Dou, 1926; Northrup, Pow, 1925; Gobel, NC, 1924; Smith, Gre, 1923; Porter, Park, 1922.
Class A: Boyd, SS, 1965; Johnson, Tor, 1958.
Class B: Asay, Byr, 1965; Spoonhunter, SS, 1961; Smith, Bas, 1960; Weglin, Hunt, 1954.
Class C: McKinney, Vet, 1965; Yeik, Yod, 1962/1963; Hillbird, RR, 1957.

Mile
Class AA
: Lind, CC, 1970; Carpenter, CC, 1969; Smith, Eva, 1947; Collins, RS, 1946; Buchan, RS, 1944/1945; Davidson, Lar, 1942; Scriffin, The, 1940; Chavarria, Tor, 1937; Landman, CC, 1936; Redfern, Whe, 1935; Thoelke, Lus, 1932; Brown, Buf, 1931; West, NC, 1929; Esmay, Dou, 1927; Thatcher, Dou, 1926; Brown, Buf, 1925; Pegg, Bas, 1922.
Class A: Mullens, UP, 1965; Walters, Wor, 1960; Pendley, Pow, 1959; Richard/Richards, StM, 1957/1958; Laue, Riv, 1954.
Class B: Soule, PB, 1970; Brown, SS, 1963; Goggles, SS, 1961; Baird, Cowl, 1956.
Class C: Carter, TS, 1969/1970; Wood, TS, 1965; Vieyra, RR, 1962/1963; Chamberlain, LaG, 1960; Martin, FtL, 1958; S. Starks, Enc, 1957.

2 Mile
Class AA: Carmago, CC, 1969.
Class C: Thomas, Arv, 1970; Allary, LaG, 1969.

120 hurdles
Class AA
: Dowler, CC, 1957; Moore, Cod, 1950/1951; Espach, Lar, 1949; Rauchfuss, Pow, 1947; J. Croft, Tor, 1946; Bloom, Pow, 1945; Stine, GR, 1942; T. Chapin, Riv, 1935; Gentle, Dou, 1932/1933; Montague, Lus, 1930; Teninty, The, 1922.
Class A: Kemp, GR, 1969; Byers, Lan, 1960; Hanlin, Dou, 1957; Kincaid, Cod, 1952.
Class B: Fullmer, Lin, 1970; Williams, Byr, 1969; Sievers, Pin, 1965; Pingrey, DF, 1960; Fiero, Lym, 1956; Jackson, Han, 1953/1954; Gregory, HS, 1951.
Class C: Smith, Bur, 1965; Rudloff, Gld, 1962; Ainsworth, Yod, 1961; Martinez, Yod, 1958; Huckfeldt, Vet, 1957.

180 hurdles
Class AA: Freeman, Lar, 1969.
Class A: Hagemeister, SS, 1965; Noel, GR, 1954.
Class B: Ecklund, Alb, 1970; Fullmer, Lin, 1965; Pingrey, DF, 1960; Rees, Lym, 1958; Davinson, Kem, 1957; Davison, Pin, 1956; Ellison, Day, 1954; Ellison, Bas, 1953; Berrier, Lym, 1951.
Class C: Kaufman, LaG, 1969; Smith, Bur, 1965; Martinez, Yod, 1957.

200 hurdles
Class AA
: Rauchfuss, Pow, 1947; J. Croft, Tor, 1946; Stine, GR, 1942; Sims, RS, 1941; Berta, RS, 1937.

220 hurdles
Class AA
: Gentle, Dou, 1933; Brundage, Cod, 1931; Montague, Lus, 1930; E. Penfield, The, 1925; Teninty, The, 1922.

Discus
Class AA
: Quinlavan, CE, 1963; Mrak, RS, 1947; Neilson, Eva, 1946; Kienlen, GR, 1945; Heron, Wor, 1944; Steiteler, RS, 1940; Steniac, Sup, 1936; Jurich, Reli, 1935; Fitzmorris/Fitzmaurice, CC, 1932/1933; Cover, The, 1925/1926; Monihan, Whe, 1924; Rhone, CC, 1923; Peyton, Dou, 1922.
Class A: A. Anderson, Dou, 1960.
Class B: Haynes, Gld, 1958; Partridge, Cowl, 1954; Walters, Lin, 1951.
Class C: McPherren, TS, 1965; Rochlitz, Carp, 1957.

High jump
Class AA
: Kipper, Lar, 1970; McGarvin, Wor, 1951; Maher, GR, 1951; Gregory, HS, 1950; Howery, HS, 1948; Heron, Wor, 1944; West, Whe, 1941; Sinadin, Mid, 1938; Fleischle, CC, 1936; T. Chapin, Riv, 1935; Thompson, Mid, 1931; Markley, Pow, 1929; Riche, NC, 1928; Ingraham, The, 1926; Haith, PB, 1923.
Class A: Powers, Gre, 1970; Hatch, Kem, 1963; LeBar, Dou, 1960; Nelson, Gil, 1957; Lawrence, Whe, 1956; Morey, Riv, 1956; Royer, Pow, 1956; Vines, Gil, 1954.
Class B: Cochrane, UP, 1963; Stoddard, MV, 1963; Dalton, Cowl, 1960; Raymond, Mort, 1958; Gregory, HS, 1951.
Class C: Dooley, Brl, 1970; McPherren, TS, 1963; Herring, Enc, 1960; Palmer, Bur, 1959; Whited, Carp, 1957.

Long jump
Class AA
: Fermelia, RS, 1948; Jew, RS, 1945; H. Braden, GR, 1941; Fleischlie, CC, 1936; Freeley, Cod, 1933; J. Debernardi, RS, 1931.
Class A: Jay, Tor, 1970; Benson, Gil, 1969; Thurmond, Dou, 1957; Lawrence, Whe, 1956.
Class B: Brown, Alb, 1965; Wirth, Byr, 1963; Brisch, Han, 1958; Stephenson, Lin, 1951.
Class C: Swarm, LaG, 1965; Brown, Alb, 1963.

Pole vault
Class AA
: Haug, GR, 1951; Walker, GR, 1945; McKethan, The, 1944; Garrett, CC, 1935; Broderick, Mid, 1929; Cover, The, 1923/1924; Walters, Dou, 1922.
Class A: Schulyer, Gre, 1960; Brow, Dou, 1960.
Class B: Sussex, LaG, 1970; Gurney, BP, 1965; Mollenbrink, Sun, 1959; Brown, DF, 1958; Trenholm, Gld, 1958; Johnson, Bas, 1958; Partridge, Cowl, 1954; Robbins, Sunr, 1951.
Class C: Garrison, Gld, 1962.

Shot put
Class AA
: Terwilliger, GR, 1950; Taggart, Cod, 1945; Bozanic, Lan, 1944; Stevens, Eva, 1941; Perkovich, RS, 1937; Thobro, RS, 1936; Jurich, Reli, 1935; Morgan, CC, 1934; Davidson, CC, 1932/1933; King, Cod, 1930; Major, Cod, 1928; Whelan, CC, 1925; Beall, Bas, 1922/1924.
Class A: Ricks, Jac, 1969; Schuyler, Gre, 1965; Vines, Gil, 1954.
Class B: McIntosh, Pin, 1957; Lookingbill, Mort, 1955; McColley, PB, 1953; Cozier, Pin, 1951.
Class C: Barkell, Egb, 1957.

Javelin
Class AA
: Begovich, RS, 1940; Loffing, Tor, 1938; Perkovich, RS, 1936/1937; Powell, The, 1933; Erickson, CC, 1932; Walters, Cod, 1931; Major, Cod, 1928; Erickson, CC, 1927; Cover, The, 1926/1924.

GIRLS
50
Class AA
: C. Saunders, Gil, 1972.

100
Class B
: C. Curtis, Bas, 1971.

220
Class B
: C. Curtis, Bas, 1971.

440
Class AA
: K. Madrid, Lar, 1971.
Class B: M. Fuller, Chu, 1971.

880
Class B
: S. Brunson, Sun, 1971.

50 hurdles
Class AA: S. Scutt, KW, 1971.
Class B: F. Williams, Bas, 1971.

High jump
Class AA
: L. Schuller, Wor, 1971.

Long jump
Class B
: F. Williams, Bas, 1971.

Shot put
Class B
: C. Standefer, TS, 1971.

Softball throw
Class B
: F. Williams, Bas, 1971.

+++

In addition, winners are missing for these years, classes and/or events:

BOYS
All classes, all events: 1972, 1968, 1967, 1966
1971 Class B
: triple jump.
1969 Class B: two mile, discus, long jump, shot put, triple jump.
1969 Class C: discus, long jump, triple jump.
1965 Class A: discus, high jump, long jump, pole vault.
1965 Class B: discus, high jump.
1965 Class C: high jump, pole vault, shot put.
1964 Class C: long jump.
1962 Class AA: discus, high jump, pole vault, shot put.
1962 Class A: discus, long jump, shot put.
1962 Class C: discus, long jump, shot put.
1961 Class A: 120 high hurdles, high jump, long jump, pole vault.
1961 Class B: 120 high hurdles, 880 relay, discus, high jump, pole vault.
1961 Class C: 100, 220, 440, mile, 180 low hurdles, 880 relay, mile relay, discus, long jump, pole vault, shot put.
1960 Class A: long jump.
1960 Class B: discus, long jump, shot put.
1960 Class C: discus, long jump, shot put.
1959 Class A: 100, 220, 440, high hurdles, low hurdles, 880 relay, discus, long jump, pole vault, shot put.
1959 Class B: 440, high hurdles, high jump, long jump, shot put.
1959 Class C: 100, 220, 440, high hurdles, low hurdles, 880 relay, mile relay, long jump.
1958 Class C: 880, low hurdles, discus, long jump, pole vault.
1956 Class B: 440, 880, discus, high jump, pole vault, shot put.
1955 Class A: 100, 440, mile, high hurdles, low hurdles, high jump.
1955 Class B: 100, 220, mile, high hurdles, low hurdles, 440 relay, discus, high jump, pole vault.
1954 Class A: discus, pole vault.
1954 Class B: long jump, shot put.
1953 Class A: 100, 220, 440, 880, mile, high hurdles, low hurdles, 880 relay, high jump, long jump, pole vault, shot put.
1953 Class B: 220, 440, 880, mile, discus, high jump, long jump.
1952 Class A: high jump, pole vault.
1952 Class B: 100, 220, 440, high hurdles, low hurdles, 880 relay, discus, high jump, long jump, pole vault, shot put.
1951 Class B: 880 relay.
1934 all-class: 50, 440, 880, mile, 120 high hurdles, 200 low hurdles, discus, high jump, javelin, long jump, pole vault.

Again, if you can help, post a comment here or email me at pschmiedt@yahoo.com.

–patrick

I’ve been doing a lot of research on state track meets this summer. With that, I’ve revamped and updated the listing of Wyoming’s state track and field champions to reflect winners back to 1922.

Wyoming’s track and field champions are listed here. Previously, I listed girls champions back to 1973 and boys champions to 1974, the extent to which the Wyoming High School Activities Association archives exist. Now, girls listings go back to 1970, the year of the first girls state track meet, and boys listings to 1922, the year of the first boys state track meet.

I used online archives available through the Casper Star-Tribune to access old records. However, not all years or events are available in the Star-Tribune’s online archive. Here’s what I am missing:

All results needed: 1972 (boys only), 1968, 1967, 1966.

Years where winners for at least one event are needed: 1971 (Class C), 1969 (Class B and C), 1965 (Class A, B and C), 1964 (Class C), 1962 (Class AA, A and C), 1961 (Class A, B and C), 1960 (Class A, B and C), 1959 (Class A, B and C), 1958 (Class C), 1956 (Class B), 1955 (Class A and B), 1954 (Class A and B), 1953 (Class A and B), 1952 (Class A and B), 1951 (Class B), 1934 (one class), 1925 (one class).

As you can see, this is a work in progress. But that’s OK! If you can provide any help filling in holes in the listings I have posted here, email me at pschmiedt@yahoo.com. Here are the listings.

I am also in search of first names for some of the new champion listings. I will put up a separate post detailing those needs in the next week or two.

–patrick

I’ve subscribed to an online database that has granted me access to some more newspaper archives, particularly for papers outside of Wyoming. With that access, I knocked 22 games off the missing games list and found incomplete, but helpful, info for one more:

Found the score for Hulett’s 16-8 loss to the Spearfish, S.D., JV on Oct. 17, 1981, in Spearfish.

Found the location for the Sept. 13, 1957, game between Vale, S.D., and Hulett; it was in Vale.

Found the score for Cowley’s 38-26 loss to Belfry, Mont., on Sept. 17, 1954, in Cowley.

Found the location for the Sept. 15, 1951, game between Byron and Colstrip, Mont.; it was in Colstrip. Noting this game’s location increased Byron’s road winning streak over this time to 19 games, which moved it into a tie for fourth all-time.

Found the score for the Nov. 4, 1949, game between Deaver-Frannie and Meeteetse; Deaver won 45-6. This increased Meeteetse’s losing streak to 22 games over the time period from 1947-51.

Found the date for Torrington’s 13-0 loss to Mitchell, Neb., on Oct. 11, 1946. Kept it on the missing games list because I still don’t have the location for the game yet.

Found the date for the Sept. 14, 1945, game between Powell and Laurel, Mont.

Found the date and location and fixed the score for Byron’s 58-8 victory against the Lovell third team on Oct. 5, 1945, in Byron.

Added the score for Star Valley’s 8-7 victory against Malad, Idaho, on Oct. 10, 1941.

Found the score for the Oct. 17, 1941, game between Sundance and Sturgis St. Martin’s, S.D.; St. Martin’s won 53-0. Also noted that the Oct. 31, 1941, game between the same two teams was canceled.

Found the score for the Oct. 24, 1940, game between Sundance and Sturgis, S.D.; Sturgis won 20-6.

Affirmed the score for Newcastle’s 20-14 loss to Edgemont, S.D., on Oct. 28, 1938.

Found two scores for Sunrise’s 1934 season: a 33-0 loss to Scottsbluff, Neb., on Sept. 21 and a 55-0 loss to Mitchell, Neb., on Oct. 5.

Added the score for Torrington’s 14-0 loss to Gering, Neb., on Nov. 2, 1934.

Found the location for Sunrise’s 20-0 victory against Mitchell, Neb., on Oct. 6, 1933; it was in Sunrise.

Found the location and date for Torrington’s 41-6 loss to Scottsbluff, Neb., on Oct. 21, 1932, in Scottsbluff.

Found the location for Lovell’s 6-6 tie with Cowley on Nov. 21, 1930; it was in Lovell.

Noted that the Oct. 25, 1929, game between Worland and Midwest was canceled.

Added the score for the 0-0 tie between Greybull and Basin on Nov. 24, 1927.

Found the score for the Nov. 24, 1927, game between Cowley and Lovell; Lovell won 41-6.

Added the number of points scored by Park City, Utah, in its 40-0 victory against Evanston on Sept. 22, 1923.

All the updates have been made on all the relevant pages.

Track

Using these archives, I’ve also added Green River as the 1942 state champion and Thermopolis as the 1923 champ. I’m planning on doing some more with some track archives pre-1973 soon; keep an eye on the track champion listings for occasional updates there.

–patrick

Jim Craig provided some valuable help for some games involving Powell and some all-state help. Here’s the updates I made thanks to his help:

Added two games to Powell’s 1945 season: a 6-6 tie with Columbus, Mont., on Sept. 8 in Powell, and an 18-0 victory against Laurel on Sept. 14-15 in Laurel (added to missing games list because an exact date couldn’t be pinned down).

Added Powell’s 7-2 loss to Laurel, Mont., on Sept. 12, 1947, in Laurel.

Corrected the score for Lovell’s 14-6 victory against Powell on Sept. 23, 1949; I had the score reversed, with Powell winning.

Added the first name and corrected the team for Laramie’s Dick Cox, a second-team all-state choice in 1951; he was previously listed with Rawlins, which was incorrect.

(Short track aside: He also found the last missing state track champion on my lists, the 1979 girls Class C 4×1 champion — Ten Sleep. Their title and time was added to the list.)

Through some of my own research, I also made these updates:

Found the location for the game between Meeteetse and Joliet, Mont., on Oct. 14, 2002; it was in Joliet.

Found the score for Deaver-Frannie’s 49-6 loss to the Billings West, Mont., JV on Oct. 26, 1962.

All the updates have been made on all the relevant pages.

–patrick

Two Wyoming high schools have an opportunity to pull off a rare championship sweep — winning the track and field, football and either the basketball or wrestling championships in the same calendar year.

The basketball-track-football calendar-year sweep has only been pulled off eight times; seven of those sweeps have been at the big-school level.

However, Pine Bluffs has the chance to do this in 2016. The Hornets won the Class 2A basketball championship in March and the 2A track and field championship in May.

The football team faces long historical odds — Pine Bluffs has never won a football championship and last won a playoff game in 2003.

The first school to do a calendar-year basketball-track-football sweep was Natrona in 1939. Since then, schools that have pulled off the feat include Laramie in 1969, Cheyenne Central in 1977 and 1979, Kelly Walsh in 1981, Gillette in 2008, Natrona again in 2010 and Snake River, the only small school to pull off this kind of sweep, in 2011.

Meanwhile, Star Valley could sweep the wrestling, track and field and football titles in the same calendar year, a feat that’s even rarer. The Braves won the 3A wrestling title and followed that up with the 3A track title last spring. Let’s not forget that Star Valley is also the defending 3A football champions.

Gillette is the only program to complete this trifecta in a calendar year, and the Camels have done it twice. Gillette completed the wrestling-track-football sweep in a calendar year first in 2006 and again in 2008.

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As noted, Star Valley won the football, wrestling and track and field titles in the 2015-16 academic year. That’s only happened five times in state history, and Star Valley became the first school to do so twice. The Braves joined Cheyenne Central (1965-66), Gillette (2008-09) and Powell (2013-14) in such a sweep; Star Valley also pulled off the same championship trifecta in 1982-83.

Eleven times, schools have swept the football-basketball-track titles in the same academic year: Sheridan in 1958-59; both Byron and Laramie in 1968-69; Cheyenne Central in 1977-78; both Southeast and Kelly Walsh in 1980-81; Burlington in 1994-95; Gillette in 1998-99; Snake River in both 2010-11 and 2011-12; and Natrona in 2014-15.

 

–patrick

A short reminder for state track and field weekend: This site lists every Wyoming high school track and field champion back to 1974 for boys and 1973 for girls, as well as team champions back to 1922. Bookmark it now so you can refer to it on Thursday, Friday and Saturday!

–patrick

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